What’s the weather like in Jerusalem?

If you’re considering moving to Jerusalem, you might be wondering what the weather is like.

First of all, it’s important to note that Jerusalem is located in the Mediterranean climate zone, which means that the summers are hot and dry, and the winters are mild and wet. The temperature can reach up to 35°C (95°F) in the summer and in the winter it can go down to 0°C (32°F).

One thing to keep in mind is that Jerusalem is situated on a mountain, so the temperature can vary depending on your elevation. The higher up you are, the cooler it will be. So, if you’re looking for a cooler place to live, you might want to consider neighborhoods like French Hill or Beit Hanina.

Another thing to keep in mind is that Jerusalem can be quite windy, especially in the spring and fall. This can make the temperature feel cooler or warmer than it actually is. It is also known for dust storms that can happen during the summer.

The winter in Jerusalem is usually mild, with occasional rain and sometimes a little bit of snow. It’s definitely not as cold as it can be in some parts of the US, but you’ll still want to bring a coat and a pair of boots. If you love snow, check out the Jerusalem Weather Forecast Facebook page, run by an amateur meteorologist, for updates.

All in all, the weather in Jerusalem can be a bit of an adjustment, but it’s nothing that you can’t handle. With the right clothing and a good attitude, you’ll be able to enjoy the sunshine and the mild temperatures in no time. And don’t forget that the warm sunshine in Jerusalem will make you forget the cold weather back in the US.

Jerusalem snow

Keep yourself healthy in any weather! Check out our handwashing guide here.

 

East Jerusalem Buses

east jerusalem buses

There’s often quite a bit of confusion around East Jerusalem buses, their routes, and their timetables, but we’re here to clear that up. The top three reasons you’ll want to hop on these bus lines are:

  1. To travel on the Jewish holidays or Sabbath (‘Shabbat’) when most public transportation is not in operation.
  2. You can still pay your fare in cash(!).
  3. To get to a neighborhood in East Jerusalem, of course!

Where They Go

Well, it’s rather apparent, but these bus routes go to East Jerusalem neighborhoods. In addition, you can take a bus line from Damascus Gate to Ramallah, Bethlehem, or to connections for Hebron, Jericho, Nablus, Tulkarem, et al.

When They Operate

Most of the bus lines operating through East Jerusalem work seven days a week, 365 days a year – yes, including Shabbat and Yom Kippur (but on the latter, they adjust routes to avoid predominantly Jewish-populated areas of the city). You’ll find that the buses run early in the morning to late in the evening, typically between 5:30 am to 10:30 pm. There is often an extended night schedule during the month of Ramadan.

How to Use The Bus

Payment can be made on the bus in cash (5.5 shekels – change is available for smaller amounts) or by using a national transit pass, known as a ‘Rav Kav’, and scanning it upon entry. There is no option to scan a QR code or pay by an app at the time of publishing (August 2022). If you’re using a Rav Kav, you can easily transfer between any bus and the light rail. If you paid cash, keep your receipt as proof of purchase –  you can typically use this up to 90 minutes from when you first started your trip to transfer to other East Jerusalem buses only.

Riding the bus can be a different experience depending on the day, time, route, and destination. Generally, you’ll find it common for men to give up their seats (without being asked) for women, and young adults will give up their seats for elders. Although there is no particular dress code, it is best to dress at least somewhat modestly (say, avoid crop tops and shorts). Speaking of modesty, exhibiting respectful behavior (not speaking loudly, for example) will benefit you.

Knowing when to get off – pay attention to the automated system in the bus, which will typically announce stops. If there is none (or it’s hard to hear/understand), follow along live with a mobile app like Moovit.

Getting off at your stop can be done by pushing a button. On some buses, you’ll push the button on the side of one of many vertical poles within the bus. On others, look directly above your seat – they’ll typically be yellow in color or the biggest button.

East Jerusalem Bus Lines

These bus lines originate from one of three clusters between Damascus Gate and Salah a-Din street in Jerusalem, all of which informally form an expanded area colloquially known as the ‘East Jerusalem Central Bus Station.’

east jerusalem bus stations

201 – Issawiya

The 201 Jerusalem bus line goes through Sheikh Jarrah, Mount Scopus, French Hill, and ends in Issawiya.

Key Points of Interest:

  • St. Joseph Hospital
  • Hebrew University
  • Hadassah Mt. Scopus (a.k.a. Hadassah Issawiya)
  • Hebrew University dormitories
  • Araba’in Mosque
  • Issawiya football field

203 – Sur Baher

The 203 bus line passes Abu Tor, through Jabal Mukaber, Sur Baher, and Umm Tuba.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Cinematheque
  • Haas Promenade
  • Gazil Junction
  • Al-Madinah al-Munawwarah

204 – Muntar

The 204 bus line goes past Abu Tor, Armon Hanatziv, East Talpiyot, and through Jabal Mukaber to Muntar.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Cinematheque
  • Haas Promenade
  • Abu Hamid Jazali School

205 – Jabal Mukaber

The 205 bus line passes Ras al Amud to Jabal Mukaber and Al-Sawahra al-Gharbiyye.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Mount of Olives
  • Sheikh Sa’ad
  • Zala’a School

206 – Jabal Mukaber

The 206 bus line passes Ras al Amud to Jabal Mukaber and Al-Sawahra al-Gharbiyye. It takes a similar route to that of the 205 bus.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Mount of Olives
  • Sheikh Sa’ad
  • Zala’a School

207 – Shuafat Refugee Camp

The 207 bus goes through Sheikh Jarrah, passes French Hill, goes through part of Shuafat, and ends up in the Shuafat Refugee Camp.

Key Points of Interest:

  • St. John and St. Joseph Hospitals
  • Givat Hamivtar Light Rail Station
  • Anata Checkpoint
  • Shuafat Terminal

218 – Ramallah

The 218 is an express bus from Damascus Gate to Ramallah. It goes through Sheikh Jarrah, passes by Beit Hanina, Pisgat Zeev, Neve Yaakov, Kafr Aqab, and Qalandiya.

Key Points of Interest:

  • St. John Hospital
  • Helen Keller School
  • Dahiat al Barid
  • Bir Nabala Junction
  • Kafr Aqab school
  • Qalandiya checkpoint
  • Atarot
  • Ramallah terminal

226 – A-Tur

The 226 passes by Wadi Joz and goes through At-Tur.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Red Crescent Hospital for Women
  • Brigham Young University (a.k.a. The Mormon University)
  • A-Tur Junction
  • HaZeitim Junction
  • Zaitoun Checkpoint

231 – Beit Jala

The 231 passes by Abu Tor, Talpiyot, Beit Safafa, and through Beit Jala and Bethlehem.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Cinematheque
  • Bank Junction (Tzomet Habankim)
  • Tunnel Checkpoint
  • Al-Khader Church
  • Beit Jala Checkpoint

232 – Beit Safafa

The 232 passes by Abu Tor and Talpiyot, and goes throughout Beit Safafa.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Cinematheque
  • Bank Junction (Tzomet Habankim)
  • Beit Safafa High School
  • Mosque Square
  • Beit Safafa Primary School

234 – Bethlehem

The 234 passes by Abu Tor, Talpiyot, Beit Safafa, and ends at Checkpoint 300.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Cinematheque
  • Bank Junction (Tzomet Habankim)
  • Checkpoint 300 (Bethlehem)
  • Rachel’s Tomb

236 – Ras al Amud

Key Points of Interest:

  • Mount of Olives
  • Shbiba School
  • Volcan College
  • Ras al Amud Square

246 – Atarot

The 246 is a route that goes between Qalandiya Checkpoint and the Atarot Industrial area.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Qaladia Checkpoint
  • Atarot Mall
  • Industrial Zone

254 – Anata

The 254 passes through Sheikh Jarrah, Shuafat, and Anata.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Givat Hatahmoshet Light Rail Station
  • Givat Hamivtar Light Rail Station
  • Al Hayat Medical Center
  • Anata Checkpoint
  • Khaled bin al Waleed Mosque

255 – A-Tor

The 255 passes through Sawana and A-Tor.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Church of Ascension
  • Makassed Hospital
  • Mormon University (BYU)
  • Hilal Hospital

256 – Silwan

The 256 passes by Ras al Amud and through Silwan.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Ras al Amud
  • Salach Intersection

257 – Ras Al Amoud

Key Points of Interest:

  • Mount of Olives
  • Ras al Amud Square

263 – Abu Dis

The 263 passes through Wadi Joz, Izariya, and Abu Dis.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Ministry of Interior
  • Abu Dis University

273 – Ramallah

The 273 goes through Sheikh Jarrah, then straight on to Beit Hanina and then Qalandiya and on to Ramallah.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Saint Joseph and Saint John Hospitals
  • Talat Hizma
  • Baladi Mall
  • Atarot
  • Qalandiya Checkpoint

274 – Ramallah

The 274 goes through Sheikh Jarrah, Shuafat, Beit Hanina, Qalandiya.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Saint Joseph and Saint John Hospitals
  • Beit Hanina Light Rail Station
  • Baladi Mall
  • Atarot
  • Qalandiya Checkpoint

275 – At-Tur

Key Points of Interest:

  • Hilal Hospital
  • Mormon University
  • Augusta Victoria
  • Makassed Hospital
  • Church of the Ascension

276 – Abu Tor

The 276 is a bus route that primarily goes through Abu Tor/A-Thuri, passing through Silwan along the way.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Cinematheque
  • Ahmad Samih Khalid School
  • City of David

285 – A-Zaim

The 285 goes through At-Tur and A-Zaim.

Key points of interest:

  • Brigham Young University
  • Hilal Hospital
  • A Zaim Checkpoint

286 – Abu Tor

The 286 goes around the Old City, as well as through parts of Silwan and Abu Tor (A-Thuri).

Key points of interest:

  • Herod’s Gate
  • Lion’s Gate
  • Dung Gate
  • Jaffa Gate
  • Cinematheque

287 – Wadi Joz

The 287 is a bus line that primarily acts as a shuttle through Wadi Joz.

  • Ministry of Interior
  • Al-Muqadasi

Looking to get to the airport? Check here for transportation to Ben Gurion Airport.