East Jerusalem Buses

east jerusalem buses

There’s often quite a bit of confusion around East Jerusalem buses, their routes, and their timetables, but we’re here to clear that up. The top three reasons you’ll want to hop on these bus lines are:

  1. To travel on the Jewish holidays or Sabbath (‘Shabbat’) when most public transportation is not in operation.
  2. You can still pay your fare in cash(!).
  3. To get to a neighborhood in East Jerusalem, of course!

Where They Go

Well, it’s rather apparent, but these bus routes go to East Jerusalem neighborhoods. In addition, you can take a bus line from Damascus Gate to Ramallah, Bethlehem, or to connections for Hebron, Jericho, Nablus, Tulkarem, et al.

When They Operate

Most of the bus lines operating through East Jerusalem work seven days a week, 365 days a year – yes, including Shabbat and Yom Kippur (but on the latter, they adjust routes to avoid predominantly Jewish-populated areas of the city). You’ll find that the buses run early in the morning to late in the evening, typically between 5:30 am to 10:30 pm. There is often an extended night schedule during the month of Ramadan.

How to Use The Bus

Payment can be made on the bus in cash (5.5 shekels – change is available for smaller amounts) or by using a national transit pass, known as a ‘Rav Kav’, and scanning it upon entry. There is no option to scan a QR code or pay by an app at the time of publishing (August 2022). If you’re using a Rav Kav, you can easily transfer between any bus and the light rail. If you paid cash, keep your receipt as proof of purchase –  you can typically use this up to 90 minutes from when you first started your trip to transfer to other East Jerusalem buses only.

Riding the bus can be a different experience depending on the day, time, route, and destination. Generally, you’ll find it common for men to give up their seats (without being asked) for women, and young adults will give up their seats for elders. Although there is no particular dress code, it is best to dress at least somewhat modestly (say, avoid crop tops and shorts). Speaking of modesty, exhibiting respectful behavior (not speaking loudly, for example) will benefit you.

Knowing when to get off – pay attention to the automated system in the bus, which will typically announce stops. If there is none (or it’s hard to hear/understand), follow along live with a mobile app like Moovit.

Getting off at your stop can be done by pushing a button. On some buses, you’ll push the button on the side of one of many vertical poles within the bus. On others, look directly above your seat – they’ll typically be yellow in color or the biggest button.

East Jerusalem Bus Lines

These bus lines originate from one of three clusters between Damascus Gate and Salah a-Din street in Jerusalem, all of which informally form an expanded area colloquially known as the ‘East Jerusalem Central Bus Station.’

east jerusalem bus stations

201 – Issawiya

The 201 Jerusalem bus line goes through Sheikh Jarrah, Mount Scopus, French Hill, and ends in Issawiya.

Key Points of Interest:

  • St. Joseph Hospital
  • Hebrew University
  • Hadassah Mt. Scopus (a.k.a. Hadassah Issawiya)
  • Hebrew University dormitories
  • Araba’in Mosque
  • Issawiya football field

203 – Sur Baher

The 203 bus line passes Abu Tor, through Jabal Mukaber, Sur Baher, and Umm Tuba.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Cinematheque
  • Haas Promenade
  • Gazil Junction
  • Al-Madinah al-Munawwarah

204 – Muntar

The 204 bus line goes past Abu Tor, Armon Hanatziv, East Talpiyot, and through Jabal Mukaber to Muntar.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Cinematheque
  • Haas Promenade
  • Abu Hamid Jazali School

205 – Jabal Mukaber

The 205 bus line passes Ras al Amud to Jabal Mukaber and Al-Sawahra al-Gharbiyye.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Mount of Olives
  • Sheikh Sa’ad
  • Zala’a School

206 – Jabal Mukaber

The 206 bus line passes Ras al Amud to Jabal Mukaber and Al-Sawahra al-Gharbiyye. It takes a similar route to that of the 205 bus.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Mount of Olives
  • Sheikh Sa’ad
  • Zala’a School

207 – Shuafat Refugee Camp

The 207 bus goes through Sheikh Jarrah, passes French Hill, goes through part of Shuafat, and ends up in the Shuafat Refugee Camp.

Key Points of Interest:

  • St. John and St. Joseph Hospitals
  • Givat Hamivtar Light Rail Station
  • Anata Checkpoint
  • Shuafat Terminal

218 – Ramallah

The 218 is an express bus from Damascus Gate to Ramallah. It goes through Sheikh Jarrah, passes by Beit Hanina, Pisgat Zeev, Neve Yaakov, Kafr Aqab, and Qalandiya.

Key Points of Interest:

  • St. John Hospital
  • Helen Keller School
  • Dahiat al Barid
  • Bir Nabala Junction
  • Kafr Aqab school
  • Qalandiya checkpoint
  • Atarot
  • Ramallah terminal

226 – A-Tur

The 226 passes by Wadi Joz and goes through At-Tur.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Red Crescent Hospital for Women
  • Brigham Young University (a.k.a. The Mormon University)
  • A-Tur Junction
  • HaZeitim Junction
  • Zaitoun Checkpoint

231 – Beit Jala

The 231 passes by Abu Tor, Talpiyot, Beit Safafa, and through Beit Jala and Bethlehem.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Cinematheque
  • Bank Junction (Tzomet Habankim)
  • Tunnel Checkpoint
  • Al-Khader Church
  • Beit Jala Checkpoint

232 – Beit Safafa

The 232 passes by Abu Tor and Talpiyot, and goes throughout Beit Safafa.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Cinematheque
  • Bank Junction (Tzomet Habankim)
  • Beit Safafa High School
  • Mosque Square
  • Beit Safafa Primary School

234 – Bethlehem

The 234 passes by Abu Tor, Talpiyot, Beit Safafa, and ends at Checkpoint 300.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Cinematheque
  • Bank Junction (Tzomet Habankim)
  • Checkpoint 300 (Bethlehem)
  • Rachel’s Tomb

236 – Ras al Amud

Key Points of Interest:

  • Mount of Olives
  • Shbiba School
  • Volcan College
  • Ras al Amud Square

246 – Atarot

The 246 is a route that goes between Qalandiya Checkpoint and the Atarot Industrial area.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Qaladia Checkpoint
  • Atarot Mall
  • Industrial Zone

254 – Anata

The 254 passes through Sheikh Jarrah, Shuafat, and Anata.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Givat Hatahmoshet Light Rail Station
  • Givat Hamivtar Light Rail Station
  • Al Hayat Medical Center
  • Anata Checkpoint
  • Khaled bin al Waleed Mosque

255 – A-Tor

The 255 passes through Sawana and A-Tor.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Church of Ascension
  • Makassed Hospital
  • Mormon University (BYU)
  • Hilal Hospital

256 – Silwan

The 256 passes by Ras al Amud and through Silwan.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Ras al Amud
  • Salach Intersection

257 – Ras Al Amoud

Key Points of Interest:

  • Mount of Olives
  • Ras al Amud Square

263 – Abu Dis

The 263 passes through Wadi Joz, Izariya, and Abu Dis.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Ministry of Interior
  • Abu Dis University

273 – Ramallah

The 273 goes through Sheikh Jarrah, then straight on to Beit Hanina and then Qalandiya and on to Ramallah.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Saint Joseph and Saint John Hospitals
  • Talat Hizma
  • Baladi Mall
  • Atarot
  • Qalandiya Checkpoint

274 – Ramallah

The 274 goes through Sheikh Jarrah, Shuafat, Beit Hanina, Qalandiya.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Saint Joseph and Saint John Hospitals
  • Beit Hanina Light Rail Station
  • Baladi Mall
  • Atarot
  • Qalandiya Checkpoint

275 – At-Tur

Key Points of Interest:

  • Hilal Hospital
  • Mormon University
  • Augusta Victoria
  • Makassed Hospital
  • Church of the Ascension

276 – Abu Tor

The 276 is a bus route that primarily goes through Abu Tor/A-Thuri, passing through Silwan along the way.

Key Points of Interest:

  • Cinematheque
  • Ahmad Samih Khalid School
  • City of David

285 – A-Zaim

The 285 goes through At-Tur and A-Zaim.

Key points of interest:

  • Brigham Young University
  • Hilal Hospital
  • A Zaim Checkpoint

286 – Abu Tor

The 286 goes around the Old City, as well as through parts of Silwan and Abu Tor (A-Thuri).

Key points of interest:

  • Herod’s Gate
  • Lion’s Gate
  • Dung Gate
  • Jaffa Gate
  • Cinematheque

287 – Wadi Joz

The 287 is a bus line that primarily acts as a shuttle through Wadi Joz.

  • Ministry of Interior
  • Al-Muqadasi

Looking to get to the airport? Check here for transportation to Ben Gurion Airport.

The Most Iconic Palestinian Food

Palestinian Food

Palestinians have a rich and varied cuisine that has been shaped by the region’s history, climate, and geography. From hearty stews to light salads, there is something for everyone to enjoy. In this article, we’ll introduce you to some of the most iconic Palestinian food that you’ll absolutely love!

Savory Palestinian Food

Falafel

Jerusalem Falafel

If you’re looking for delicious and iconic Palestinian food, look no further than falafel! These deep-fried balls of chickpeas or fava beans are usually served in pita bread with salad and tahini sauce, making for a hearty and satisfying meal. Falafel is a popular street food in Palestine, so you can find it just about anywhere you go. Whether you’re enjoying it as part of a meal or snacking on it on the go, falafel is definitely a must-try when you’re in Palestine!

Hummus

Jerusalem Hummus

Hummus is a delicious, healthy food that is an integral part of Palestinian culture. This creamy dish is made from chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, and garlic, and is often served with pita bread or vegetables. Hummus is a great option for vegetarians and vegans, as well as those who are looking for a hearty, yet healthy meal.

Musakhan

Musakhan

Musakhan is a Palestinian dish that is typically made with chicken, onions, and sumac. It is often served as a main course, but can also be served as a side dish. Musakhan is a popular dish among Palestinians, and is often served at special occasions such as weddings and holidays.

Maqluba

Maqluba

Maqluba is absolutely the national dish of Palestine! This traditional rice and meat casserole is bursting with flavor, and is sure to leave you feeling satisfied. Maqluba can be made with chicken, lamb, or beef, and is typically served with a side of yogurt or salad. However, my preferred combination is chicken with potato and cauliflower – just like my mother-in-law makes.

Mansaf

Mansaf

Mansaf is a dish of rice and lamb cooked in a special yogurt sauce (jameed). Mansaf is traditionally served on a large platter and shared by everyone at the table. This dish is often reserved for special occasions, such as weddings and holidays.

Ouzi

Ouzi

This flavorful and filling dish is typically made with chicken or lamb, rice, and a variety of vegetables, all of which are cooked together in one pot. Ouzi rice is often served on special occasions and holidays, but it can also be enjoyed as a simple weeknight meal. If you’re looking to try your hand at making this popular dish, check out this recipe.

Kusa Mahshi (Stuffed Squash)

Kusa Mahshi

There’s something special about stuffed squash. Perhaps it’s the fact that they’re one of those rare vegetables that can be both savory and sweet. Or maybe it’s the beautiful presentation when they’re sliced open, revealing their colorful filling.  Kusa mahshi is made by stuffing squash with rice, ground meat, onions, and spices. The stuffing is usually quite simple, but it can be jazzed up with raisins, pine nuts, or other extras. Once the squash is stuffed, they’re cooked until tender and served hot.

Waraq Dawali (Stuffed Grape Leaves)

Waraq Dawali (Stuffed Grape Leaves)

Waraq dawali is a traditional Palestinian dish made of grape leaves stuffed with rice, meat, and spices. The dish is often served as a main course or as an appetizer. It is a popular dish during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

Waraq dawali is a delicious and healthy dish that is perfect for any occasion. The grape leaves are stuffed with a flavorful mixture of rice, meat, and spices. The dish is then cooked until the grape leaves are tender and the filling is cooked through.

This dish is sure to please everyone at your next meal!

Molokhia

Molokhia

Molokhia is a traditional Palestinian soup that is usually made with chicken or beef broth, and is often served with rice. The soup gets its name from the molokhia plant, which is also known as Corchorus olitorius or Jew’s mallow.

The molokhia plant is native to Africa and has been used in traditional African cuisine for centuries. Molokhia is a leafy green vegetable that has a mucilaginous texture and is often used as a thickening agent in soups and stews.

The molokhia plant is believed to have numerous health benefits, including being a good source of vitamins A and C, as well as iron and calcium. Molokhia soup is traditionally made by simmering the leaves of the molokhia plant in chicken or beef broth until they are tender. Once the leaves are cooked, they are then pureed into a smooth soup.

Molokhia soup can be served either hot or cold and is often garnished with lemon juice, chopped parsley, and garlic.

Mana’eesh with Za’atar

Manaeesh Zaatar

When it comes to Palestinian cuisine, one of the most beloved foods is mana’eesh (manakeesh outside of Jerusalem). This flatbread is typically topped with za’atar, a spice blend made with thyme, sumac, and sesame seeds. Mana’eesh is usually served for breakfast or as a snack, and it’s a staple of Palestinian cuisine.

If you’re looking to try mana’eesh for yourself, you can find it at many Middle Eastern restaurants or bakeries. Or, if you’re feeling ambitious, you can even make it at home! Just follow this recipe and you’ll be enjoying delicious mana’eesh in no time.

Ka’ak

Ka'ak Al Quds

Also known as a Jerusalem bagel, ka’ak is a staple of the Jerusalemite diet, but can be found in nearly every bakery in the country. Ka’ak is made from an unleavened dough that is formed into a flatbread and then baked in a hot oven. The result is a crispy, chewy bread that is perfect for dipping in olive oil or enjoying with a cup of tea.

While ka’ak may be simple in appearance, it is rich in history. This bread dates back to ancient times, and was even mentioned in the Bible. Today, it remains an important part of Palestinian culture, and is enjoyed by people of all ages. Whether you’re snacking on ka’ak at a street market or sharing a meal with friends, this bread is sure to bring a taste of Palestine to your table.

Fasoulya Khadra

Fasuliya Khadra

This dish is made with green beans, tomatoes, and onions, and is typically served with rice or pita bread. Fasoulya khadra is the perfect meal for a cold winter day, or any day when you’re looking for a comforting and filling meal.

Fasoulya Bayda

Fasuliya Bayda

This traditional stew is made with white beans, tomatoes, and plenty of garlic and herbs. It’s typically served with rice or bread, making it a perfect meal for any time of day.

Sfiha

Sfiha

This dish is traditionally made with ground lamb, onions, and spices and is usually served as an appetizer or main course. There are many variations of sfiha, but pictured above are two popular versions of Palestinian sfiha – one made with a tomato-based sauce and the other a tahini-based sauce.

Fatayer

Sabanach

This scrumptious triangle is stuffed with spinach and therefore often known by the name ‘sabanach’ (literally: ‘spinach’ in Palestinian Arabic). This comes warm out of the oven and rarely lasts for more than a few moments on a platter.

Fattoush

Fattoush

When thinking of Palestinian cuisine, many people immediately think of fattoush. This dish is a salad made with fresh vegetables, herbs, and fried pita bread. It is a staple of Palestinian cooking and is often served as a starter or side dish. Fattoush is a simple yet flavorful dish that is sure to please everyone at the table.

Shorbat Freekeh

Shorbat Freekeh

This dish is traditionally made with smoked chicken or lamb, and is simmered in a broth with freekeh – roasted green wheat. Shorbat freekeh is not only delicious but also packed with nutrients and antioxidants. Freekeh is a great source of fiber, protein and vitamins, making it a healthy and filling meal. This dish is often enjoyed during special occasions and holidays but can be enjoyed any time of year.

Mujadara

Mujadara

Mujadara is a dish made of rice and lentils, and it is an iconic Palestinian food. This dish is usually served with a side of yogurt or salad, and it is a very popular meal among Palestinians.

Malfoof

Malfoof (Cabbage Rolls)

Malfoof is Palestine’s answer to stuffed cabbage. It is typically filled with rice and minced meat and cooked in yogurt or a tomato-based sauce.

Kafta b’siniyeh

Kofte b'Siniyeh

Kafta (also kofta or kofte) are essentially kabobs in the shape of balls or torpedoes, made with ground lamb, onions, and spices, and is cooked in either a tomato or tahini sauce. Most families also add sliced potatoes and tomatoes atop the meat.

Sweet Palestinian Food

Ma’amoul

Maamoul

These little shortbread cookies are traditionally filled with either dates, nuts, or a combination of both, and they are absolutely delicious. Ma’amoul is often served during special occasions like weddings and holidays, but they are also the perfect treat to enjoy any time you want something sweet. If you haven’t tried ma’amoul before, you definitely need to give them a try – you’ll be hooked after just one bite!

Knafeh

Knafeh

Knafeh is a delicious Palestinian dessert made with shredded phyllo dough, sweet cheese, and syrup. It’s often served at weddings and other special occasions. The most popular version is called Nabulsi, but you can also find amazing knafeh at special cafes in Nazareth and Jerusalem.

Qatayef

Qatayef

Qatayef is a traditional Palestinian dessert that is made during the month of Ramadan. It is a type of pancake that is filled with either sweet or savory fillings and then fried. Qatayef can be served as a dessert or a main dish, and it is often accompanied by Arabic coffee.

Halawa

Halawa

This delicious sweet is made from ground sesame seeds, sugar, and spices, and is often eaten as a snack or dessert. Halawa is also a popular ingredient in many Middle Eastern desserts, such as Baklava and Kanafeh. If you’re ever in Palestine, be sure to try some of this delicious treat!

Sahlab

Sahlab

Sahlab is part drink part pudding that is made with milk, rice flour, and sugar – and, traditionally, orchid (hence the name). It is mot popular during the winter in Palestine and is often served with shredded coconut and chopped pistachios.

Palestinian recipes are rich and varied, with something to offer everyone. Whether you’re looking for a hearty meal to warm you up on a cold day or a light and refreshing dish to enjoy in the summer heat, tasty food from Palestine has got you covered. So next time you’re in the mood for something new, be sure to give Palestinian cuisine a try – your taste buds will thank you!

Want something spicy? Check out our zhug/shatta spicy green condiment recipe.

Zhug or Shatta? Spicy Sauce Recipe

Zhug or Shatta? Spicy Sauce Recipe

The Middle East is certainly hot and spicy … and we don’t just mean the people! Cuisine in the region bursts with flavor waiting to test your tastebuds. Can you stand the heat? Get in the kitchen and try out this quick and easy recipe for a delicious spicy sauce called ‘Zhug’ (סחוג) in Hebrew and known as ‘Shatta’ (شطة) in Palestinian Arabic. There are red and green versions of our team’s favorite ethnic condiment, so we’ve provided you with both (even though we prefer the green version or “zhug yarok”).

Green Zhug Recipe

zhug-green-spicy-paste
Spicy green Yemenite condiment known as sahaweq/zhug/shatta.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup of finely chopped fresh cilantro (coriander)
  • 5 serrano peppers (serrano are skinny and slightly longer green peppers)
  • 3 large garlic cloves
  • 1/3 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/3 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon water
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil

Preparation:

  1. Wash the serrano peppers. Seed them and remove the white pith. Chop coarsely and place in a food processor.
  2. Wash the cilantro well and pat dry. Remove stems and chop the leaves. Add to the food processor.
  3. Peel the garlic and add to the pepper and cilantro mixture. Add cumin and salt.
  4. Blend. Add water and olive oil as needed. Blend until desired consistency is reached.

Red Zhug Recipe

harissa-red-spicy-paste
Delicious red sahaweq/shatta, also known as harissa.

Ingredients:

  • 5 oz of dried hot red peppers
  • 2 tablespoons of cumin
  • a couple of pinches of black pepper
  • 7 cardamom pods, ground
  • 2 whole heads of garlic, peeled and chopped
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 pieces of cilantro, washed, stemmed and chopped

Preparation:

  1. Add all above ingredients to a stone or clay mortar.
  2. Grind into a paste with the pestle.

Either of the above Middle Eastern spicy condiment recipes can be used for a variety of dishes. Marinate a protein (such as fish) in the sauce, douse over sides like rice or hummus, or take a piece of bread and spread it on in a thick layer for a great bite!

This spicy sauce condiment goes great with Palestinian food, too.

Primary & Secondary English Language Schools in Israel

Primary & Secondary English Language Schools in Israel

English Schools in Israel

Finding the right school as an expat can genuinely make or break your child’s academic experience. Most schools in Israel either teach in Hebrew or Arabic. However, there are a few schools throughout the country that do provide instruction in the English language. If you’re looking for English schools in Israel – whether it’s an elementary school, middle school or junior high, or high school experience, I’ve compiled a comprehensive list of those institutes. These are all full-time programs whose primary language of instruction is English, whether American or British. If I missed one, let me know in the comments section below!

English Schools in Israel

Givat Haviva International School

Location: Givat Haviva (East of Hadera)
Grades: 11-12
Curriculum: International Baccalaureate
Accreditation: International Baccalaureate Organization
Religious Affiliation: unaffiliated
Starting Tuition: $25,000 USD
Financial Aid: Available
Coed/Boys Only/Girls Only: Coed
On-Campus Boarding Availability: Yes
Google rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Is it possible to have a genuinely pluralistic and integrated school that addresses the local dynamic while providing quality education? Absolutely! Givat Haviva fosters a Shared Society environment, where the students are intentionally made up of equal parts Palestinian, Israel, and international backgrounds. One of the best things about this school is that they openly state that no qualified, admitted student will be turned away due to an inability to pay for tuition. They actively seek donations to cover the expenses of students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Walworth Barbour American International School

Location: Even Yehuda (Adjacent to Netanya)
Grades: K-12
Curriculum: U.S. Standard
Accreditation: Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
Religious Affiliation: unaffiliated
Starting Tuition: 61,400 NIS
Financial Aid: Available
Coed/Boys Only/Girls Only: Coed
On-Campus Boarding Availability: Yes
Google rating: 4.2 out of 5 stars

English Schools in the Tel Aviv Area

Eastern Mediterranean International School

Location: Kfar Yarok (Tel Aviv adjacent)
Grades: 10-12
Curriculum: International Baccalaureate
Accreditation: International Baccalaureate Organisation
Religious Affiliation: unaffiliated
Starting Tuition: $32,000 USD
Financial Aid: Available
Coed/Boys Only/Girls Only: Coed
On-Campus Boarding Availability: Yes
Google rating: 4.1 out of 5 stars

King Solomon School

Location: Kfar Yarok (Tel Aviv adjacent)
Grades: Preschool-12
Curriculum: U.K. Standard & Israeli Standard
Accreditation: Israeli Ministry of Education
Religious Affiliation: Jewish
Starting Tuition: 60,000 NIS
Financial Aid: Available
Coed/Boys Only/Girls Only: Coed
On-Campus Boarding Availability: No
Google rating: 3 out of 5 stars

Tabeetha School 

Location: Jaffa
Grades: K-12
Curriculum: U.K. Standard
Religious Affiliation: Church of Scotland
Starting Tuition: 14,000 NIS
Financial Aid: Contact the school
Application Fee: Contact the school
Coed/Boys Only/Girls Only: Coed
On-Campus Boarding Availability: No
Google rating: 4 out of 5 stars
Employee rating (Glassdoor): 3 out of 5 stars

TreeHouse International School

Location: Herzliya Pituach
Grades: Preschool-12
Curriculum: U.S. Standard
Accreditation: Western Association of Schools and Colleges
Religious Affiliation: unaffiliated
Starting Tuition: 82,000 NIS
Financial Aid: Contact the school
Coed/Boys Only/Girls Only: Coed
On-Campus Boarding Availability: No
Google rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars
Employee rating (Glassdoor): 2.2 out of 5 stars

English Schools in Jerusalem

Anglican International School Jerusalem

Location: Jerusalem (Center)
Grades: K-12
Curriculum: UK Curriculum, International Primary Curriculum, International Baccalaureate
Accreditation: Middle States Association, International Baccalaureate Program, and Council of British International Schools
Religious Affiliation
: Anglican Church
Starting Tuition: 62,600 NIS
Financial Aid: Contact the school
Coed/Boys Only/Girls Only: Coed
On-Campus Boarding Availability: No
Google rating: 3.4 out of 5 stars

Jerusalem American International School

Location: Jerusalem (South)
Grades: Preschool-9
Curriculum: U.S. Standard
Accreditation: Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
Religious Affiliation: unaffiliated
Starting Tuition: 46,350 NIS
Financial Aid: Available
Coed/Boys Only/Girls Only: Coed
On-Campus Boarding Availability: Yes
Google rating: 4.2 out of 5 stars

Jerusalem American School

Location: Jerusalem (North, Beit Hanina)
Grades: Preschool-12
Curriculum: U.S. Standard
Accreditation: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA)
Religious Affiliation: unaffiliated
Starting Tuition: Contact the school
Financial Aid: Contact the school
Coed/Boys Only/Girls Only: Coed
On-Campus Boarding Availability: No
Google rating: 3.4 out of 5 stars